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Solved: Why Does Windows Think Wireless Keyboard Is Toaster?

  • Why Windows may mistakenly identify your wireless keyboard as a toaster device due to a faulty driver installation or a corrupted registry entry.
  • How to fix this problem by editing the Class and ClassGuid values in the registry for your keyboard device.
  • How to prevent this problem from happening again by installing drivers from reliable sources and scanning your computer for malware.

Have you ever encountered a strange situation where Windows thinks that your wireless keyboard is a toaster? If so, you are not alone. This is a rare but possible issue that can happen due to a faulty driver installation or a corrupted registry entry. In this article, we will explain why this happens and how to fix it with a few easy steps.

Why Does Windows Think That My Wireless Keyboard Is a Toaster?

What Is the Windows Registry and Why Does It Matter?

The Windows Registry is a database that stores configuration settings and options for the Windows operating system and the applications and hardware devices installed on it. The registry contains information such as the device type, location, version, and driver details for each device connected to your computer.

The registry is constantly accessed by Windows and other programs to read and write data. When you install or uninstall a program, change a setting, or plug in a device, the registry is updated accordingly. However, sometimes the registry may get corrupted or contain incorrect or outdated information. This can cause various problems, such as errors, crashes, performance issues, or device misidentification.

How Does Windows Identify Devices?

Windows identifies devices based on the Class and ClassGuid entries in the INF file used to install the device. An INF file is a text file that contains information and instructions for installing and configuring a device driver. A Class entry specifies the general category of the device, such as Keyboard, Mouse, Display, etc. A ClassGuid entry specifies a unique identifier for the device class, such as {4D36E96B-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318} for keyboards.

Windows uses these entries to assign a device icon and a friendly name in the Device Manager, which is a tool that displays all your installed hardware devices and allows you to manage their drivers and settings. For example, if you have a wireless keyboard installed, you should see an icon of a keyboard and a name like “Wireless Keyboard Device” under the Keyboards category in the Device Manager.

Why Does Windows Think That My Wireless Keyboard Is a Toaster?

Sometimes, Windows may mistakenly identify your wireless keyboard as a toaster device. This means that instead of seeing a keyboard icon and name in the Device Manager, you will see a toaster icon and name under the Other devices category. This can happen for several reasons, such as:

  • The INF file used to install the keyboard driver was corrupted or modified.
  • The keyboard driver was installed from an unreliable source or was not compatible with your Windows version.
  • The registry entry for the keyboard device was corrupted or overwritten by another program or malware.
  • The keyboard device was not properly recognized by Windows due to a hardware or software issue.

The most likely reason for this problem is that the INF file or the registry entry for the keyboard device contains an incorrect Class or ClassGuid value. For some reason, Windows has assigned the Class value of “Toaster” and the ClassGuid value of {A45C254E-DF1C-4EFD-8020-67D146A850E0} to your keyboard device. These values are actually used for an example toaster driver provided by Microsoft as part of its driver development kit. This driver is not meant to be used for real devices, but only for testing purposes.

How to Fix This Problem?

The easiest way to fix this problem is to edit the registry entry for your keyboard device and change the Class and ClassGuid values to the correct ones. To do this, you will need to follow these steps:

  1. Open the Device Manager by pressing Windows Key + R, typing devmgmt.msc, and pressing Enter.
  2. Locate your keyboard device under the Other devices category. It should have a yellow exclamation mark over its icon and a name like “Toaster Device”. Right-click on it and select Properties.
  3. In the Properties window, go to the Details tab and select Device instance path from the Property drop-down menu. You will see a value like ACPI\PNP0303\4&2C0F5F7A&0. Copy this value or write it down somewhere.
  4. Open the Registry Editor by pressing Windows Key + R, typing regedit, and pressing Enter.
  5. In the Registry Editor window, navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Enum\ACPI\PNP0303\4&2C0F5F7A&0 (or whatever value you copied from step 3). You should see two entries named Class and ClassGuid on the right pane.
  6. Double-click on the Class entry and change its value data from Toaster to Keyboard. Click OK to save the change.
  7. Double-click on the ClassGuid entry and change its value data from {A45C254E-DF1C-4EFD-8020-67D146A850E0} to {4D36E96B-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}. Click OK to save the change.
  8. Close the Registry Editor and restart your computer.

After restarting your computer, you should see your keyboard device correctly identified as a keyboard under the Keyboards category in the Device Manager. You should also be able to use your keyboard normally without any issues.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Question: How do I know if my keyboard driver is installed correctly?

Answer: You can check the status of your keyboard driver in the Device Manager. If your keyboard device has a green check mark over its icon and a name like “Wireless Keyboard Device”, it means that your keyboard driver is installed correctly and working properly. If your keyboard device has a yellow exclamation mark over its icon and a name like “Toaster Device” or “Unknown Device”, it means that your keyboard driver is not installed correctly or has a problem.

Question: How do I update or reinstall my keyboard driver?

Answer: You can update or reinstall your keyboard driver in the Device Manager. To do this, right-click on your keyboard device and select Update driver or Uninstall device. Then, follow the instructions on the screen. You may need to restart your computer for the changes to take effect. Alternatively, you can download the latest keyboard driver from the manufacturer’s website and install it manually.

Question: How do I prevent this problem from happening again?

Answer: To prevent this problem from happening again, you should always install drivers from reliable sources and make sure they are compatible with your Windows version. You should also avoid modifying or deleting registry entries unless you know what you are doing. You should also scan your computer regularly for malware and viruses that may corrupt or overwrite your registry entries.

Summary

In this article, we have explained why Windows may think that your wireless keyboard is a toaster and how to fix this problem by editing the registry. We have also answered some frequently asked questions related to this topic. We hope this article has helped you solve your keyboard issue and learn more about the Windows registry and device drivers.

Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice. Editing the registry can be risky and may cause irreversible damage to your system if done incorrectly. We are not responsible for any loss or damage caused by following the instructions in this article. Always back up your registry before making any changes and proceed at your own risk.

Alex Lim is a certified IT Technical Support Architect with over 15 years of experience in designing, implementing, and troubleshooting complex IT systems and networks. He has worked for leading IT companies, such as Microsoft, IBM, and Cisco, providing technical support and solutions to clients across various industries and sectors. Alex has a bachelor’s degree in computer science from the National University of Singapore and a master’s degree in information security from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is also the author of several best-selling books on IT technical support, such as The IT Technical Support Handbook and Troubleshooting IT Systems and Networks. Alex lives in Bandar, Johore, Malaysia with his wife and two chilrdren. You can reach him at [email protected] or follow him on Website | Twitter | Facebook

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