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SOA-C02: What should SysOps do to update AWS account name

Question

A SysOps administrator needs to update an AWS account name. What should the SysOps administrator do to accomplish this goal?

A. Add the AdministratorAccess policy to the SysOps administrator’s IAM user.
B. Add the AWS_ConfigureRole policy to the SysOps administrator’s IAM user.
C. Change the AWS account name through the AWS Trusted Advisor interface.
D. Sign in as the AWS account root user to make the change.

Answer

D. Sign in as the AWS account root user to make the change.

Explanation

The correct answer is D. Sign in as the AWS account root user to make the change.

The AWS account name is the name that identifies your AWS account in the AWS Management Console, the AWS CLI, and the AWS SDKs. You can change your AWS account name at any time, but you need to have the appropriate permissions and credentials to do so.

Option A is incorrect because adding the AdministratorAccess policy to the SysOps administrator’s IAM user is not sufficient to change the AWS account name. The AdministratorAccess policy grants full access to all AWS services and resources, but it does not grant access to the AWS account settings. Only the AWS account root user can access and modify the AWS account settings, such as the account name, email address, password, and security questions.

Option B is incorrect because adding the AWS_ConfigureRole policy to the SysOps administrator’s IAM user is not relevant to changing the AWS account name. The AWS_ConfigureRole policy grants permissions to configure roles for cross-account access, which is a feature that allows you to delegate access to resources in one AWS account to users or roles in another AWS account. This policy has nothing to do with changing the AWS account name or settings.

Option C is incorrect because changing the AWS account name through the AWS Trusted Advisor interface is not possible. The AWS Trusted Advisor is a service that provides best practices and recommendations for improving your AWS environment in terms of cost optimization, performance, security, fault tolerance, and service limits. The AWS Trusted Advisor does not provide any option or feature to change your AWS account name or settings.

Option D is correct because signing in as the AWS account root user to make the change is the only way to change your AWS account name. The AWS account root user is the email address and password that you used to create your AWS account. The root user has complete access and control over all aspects of your AWS account, including the account settings. To change your AWS account name as the root user, you need to follow these steps:

  1. Sign in to the [AWS Management Console] as the root user.
  2. In the navigation bar, choose your account name and then choose My Account.
  3. On the Account Settings page, under Account Name, choose Edit.
  4. Enter a new name for your account and choose Save changes.

Amazon AWS Certified SysOps Administrator – Associate certification exam practice question and answer (Q&A) dump with detail explanation and reference available free, helpful to pass the Amazon AWS Certified SysOps Administrator – Associate exam and earn Amazon AWS Certified SysOps Administrator – Associate certification.

Alex Lim is a certified IT Technical Support Architect with over 15 years of experience in designing, implementing, and troubleshooting complex IT systems and networks. He has worked for leading IT companies, such as Microsoft, IBM, and Cisco, providing technical support and solutions to clients across various industries and sectors. Alex has a bachelor’s degree in computer science from the National University of Singapore and a master’s degree in information security from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is also the author of several best-selling books on IT technical support, such as The IT Technical Support Handbook and Troubleshooting IT Systems and Networks. Alex lives in Bandar, Johore, Malaysia with his wife and two chilrdren. You can reach him at [email protected] or follow him on Website | Twitter | Facebook

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