Four Tips to Safeguard Your Machine Shop from Cybersecurity Vulnerabilities

Unfortunately, no type of industry is immune from cyberattacks. Hackers are increasingly using more sophisticated methods of accessing company data and wreaking havoc, so every kind of business needs to know how to safeguard against such potential threats, including manufacturing companies.

Four Tips to Safeguard Your Machine Shop from Cybersecurity Vulnerabilities

Check out the following four helpful tips to ensure your machine shop takes the necessary precautions against cybersecurity vulnerabilities.

Content Summary

Use a Strong Firewall and Authentication Tools
Adopt Encrypted Email
Continually Monitor Your Networks for Potential Data Smuggling
Train Your Workforce to Be Security Savvy

Use a Strong Firewall and Authentication Tools

CNC machines have revolutionized the manufacturing industry. With computer code instructing the machinery, there is a higher degree of accuracy and quality and no need for single machine operators.

However, there are ways in which cybercriminals could gain access to your CNC network and do things like hack a machine’s program so that it makes defective parts that end up going to market without the machine shop operators’ awareness, or infiltrate a CNC machine to steal confidential proprietary information.

Criminals could even sell second-hand machinery that has been compromised to gain access to a company’s CNC network. So, if you are planning on buying used CNC machinery, make sure it comes from a reputable vendor like Revelation Machinery.

You can browse through some used lathe machinery and other equipment on the company’s website to find out more about the range of products on offer.

Aside from buying machines from trustworthy sellers, you can safeguard your machine shop against CNC machine cyber threats by installing robust firewalls, using authentication tools, and keeping your software and operating systems updated.

Adopt Encrypted Email

Your machine shop must have security practices in place that prevent passwords from being easily guessable by hackers.

If your company uses easy-to-guess passwords like 12345 or the same password for multiple logins, you are leaving your business open to potential cyberattacks.

But manufacturing firms should take a further step to ensure sensitive information does not fall into the hands of cybercriminals: using encrypted email.

Hackers can perform reconnaissance to see which networks or machines could be easy to infiltrate. They then use the information they have gathered to plan when and how to attack.

A 2019 study by CyberX found only 31% of companies use encrypted email, so many companies are behind in the security measures they should be taking. If you want to stop a hacker from accessing company emails, ensure everyone in your company uses encrypted email.

Continually Monitor Your Networks for Potential Data Smuggling

According to a 2018 study by Vectra, data smuggling is one of the most common methods used by cybercriminals to perform data exfiltration against manufacturing companies.

Data smuggling happens when an external hacker uses an internal host device to access data from at least one server and transfer it to an external location.

To safeguard your machine shop against data smuggling, you need to monitor your networks continually and check for anything that seems odd. If any strange characteristics are found, your IT experts can investigate by digging deeper to identify the threat.

Train Your Workforce to Be Security Savvy

Often, hackers will use other standard cybercrime methods like sending phishing emails. If a member of your workforce opens a phishing email in a work email account and clicks on the link, malware could be unknowingly downloaded or the hacker could get access to log-in information.

Every member of your company must be trained in how to identify potential security threats. Furthermore, training sessions should be ongoing so that every team member is always up-to-date on the latest best practices for identifying and preventing cyberattacks.