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Chaos Engineering: Why do Big Tech firms intentionally destroy their services in production?

The answer is they want to verify that their distributed system is as reliable as they have designed it to be. This methodology is called ‘Chaos Engineering,’ which was first used by Netflix about 12 years ago. How to try out chaos engineering in a system?

Chaos Engineering: Why do Big Tech firms intentionally destroy their services in production? Obviously, some care must be taken when doing this. After all, we do not destroy our production services for fun, or to terrify our clients. We do chaos engineering to find pain points in the system; it is a service for our clients. To do this successfully, it’s helpful to prepare, like this:

  1. Have a plan. In statistics terminology, we need to have a hypothesis for the behavior of the selected service that we want to bring down with chaos engineering.
  2. Calculate blast radius. When a service is down, the failure may cascade to other services. So we need to have an idea of how wide the impact will be, known as the ‘blast radius.’
  3. Good monitoring. You need to double-check that the services within the blast radius have good monitoring, so we know how well the experiment proceeds, and whether the blast radius has widened.
  4. Have a runbook. In this runbook, we document the steps we will take to bring down the service, the steps to bring it back up, and most importantly, the emergency plan to stop the experiment.

That’s all set. You are good to go.

Over to you: some teams, such as QA and SRE, maybe against chaos engineering – sometimes for understandable reasons. How do you convince them that it’s a valuable exercise?

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