5 Tips to Stay Safe While Using Campus Wi-Fi

Nobody would argue that now Internet access is essential for the studying process. It has the potential to increase educational quality in a variety of ways. It provides access to a plethora of information, knowledge, and educational resources, expanding learning possibilities both inside and beyond the classroom. Teachers utilize internet resources to plan classes, and students use them to broaden their horizons.

5 Tips to Stay Safe While Using Campus Wi-Fi

Content Summary

What is a secured connection?
Turn off the automatic connections
Use a VPN
Don’t share too much information
Keep your software updated
Install the firewall
Keep an eye on the HTTPS

Of course, the Internet for students is much more. It gives you access to unique tools to facilitate your studying process – Google Instruments for teamwork, TrustMyPaper for professional writing assistance, Canva for making presentations and so much more. Regardless of the purpose, everyone should care about keeping their laptop or any other device safe while using campus Wi-Fi. Here are a few tips on how to protect yourself from the hazards it can bring.

What is a secured connection?

Campus Wi-Fi is free (if not to take into account the high tuition expenses involved with simply being there), and several universities have made it a priority to provide enough speed for all students attending sessions. They haven’t offered a secure connection, though. So what exactly is it?

You’re either connected to a password-protected, encrypted network or an unsecured network when you connect to Wi-Fi. “Everyone linked is exposed to outside assault if basic security precautions are not used” – warns Gregory Chapman, an IT field writer at Supreme Dissertations. Hackers love public Wi-Fi connections because they can go through numerous victims to discover information worth stealing, including all user’s personal data.

It’s also not a difficult task; a hacker with minimum experience can get into an open Wi-Fi network in about eleven minutes. There is yet hope. There are several security precautions you may take to make your use of campus Wi-Fi safer.

Turn off the automatic connections

Your computer will remember a Wi-Fi network when you connect to it for the first time. Your computer will automatically rejoin that network the next time you are in the range of it. Most PCs have this “automatically connect” feature set to default. However, this may cause your device to join any available free network, including potentially dangerous rogue networks.

Before going in search of free campus Wi-Fi, make sure your computer’s automatic connections option is switched off.

Use a VPN

If you’re currently studying, you’re undoubtedly already familiar with virtual private networks, or VPNs. VPNs allow you to mask your IP address and access the internet anonymously. It is beneficial to all the public places, including offices, cafés, and cinemas.

While using other networks, a VPN secures your data by masking your browser history, financial information, account passwords, and other sensitive information from malicious internet users. It encrypts your traffic and passes it through a ‘tunnel’, making it exceedingly difficult to decode or intercept. This encryption will be available on the go if you have an app installed on the devices you use to connect to a public network.

Don’t share too much information

Think twice before you share something on the Internet or send information in an email, especially if you are using campus Wi-Fi. Any information that you touch on a public network is subject to attack. These simple safeguards offer some security against haphazard hackers and identity thieves that target wireless networks. Criminals, on the other hand, will ultimately discover a method to circumvent any security system if they are determined enough.

If you want to be secure, avoid inputting any important information when using a public Wi-Fi network, such as your credit card number or any other information regarding your finances. If you don’t want your personal information taken, don’t access it. For instance, check your bank account on your phone using your cellular connection instead of campus Wi-Fi.

Keep your software updated

Installing software updates as soon as they become available is one of the most critical things you can do. Both operating systems and individual software packages receive software upgrades.

These upgrades will bring a slew of new features, as well as the removal of dated functionality, updated drivers, bug patches, and, most crucially, security hole repairs, to your machine. So, instead of ignoring that irritating message window informing you that new updates are available, take a few minutes to install them.

Install the firewall

One of the strongest protections against hazardous assaults on your computer is the firewall. It works as a barrier between your computer and the internet. The firewall stops a file or webpage from accessing your device if it is marked as hazardous. It protects your computer or network from outside cyberattackers by filtering out harmful or unneeded network traffic. Firewalls can also prevent dangerous malware from gaining internet access to a machine or network.

Firewalls, on the other hand, might be overly protective at times. They can prohibit you from visiting sites that you wish to visit, which is especially problematic if you use the Internet to watch TV and movies or download music. Before you go looking for a Wi-Fi network, ensure your firewall is turned on and functioning, and that you have up-to-date anti-malware software installed.

Keep an eye on the HTTPS

A website’s SSL certificate is one of the most critical aspects of internet security. You’ve for sure noticed that before the www, website URLs include several letters. This is usually http:// or https://.

Both are intended to keep website visitors safe, but there is one significant difference: HTTP connections are not encrypted. HTTPS connections are protected by encryption. Turn around and flee if you’re using a public Wi-Fi connection and see a website that doesn’t have an HTTPS certificate.

Although public Wi-Fi is hazardous, that does not imply you should avoid it entirely. By utilizing the proper security tools and up-to-date antivirus software, you can take advantage of this facility without jeopardizing your security. Furthermore, when using public Wi-Fi, you must be especially cautious about your movements. If you follow these guidelines, you may be confident that your information is secure.