Valve Anti-Cheat Banned Over 40,000 Game Accounts After Steam Summer Sale


Valve’s anti-cheat service (VAC) auto-detected 40,429 cheating accounts on 6 July 2017, day after Steam Summer Sale, according to Steam Database. VAC is Valve‘s in-house method of detecting cheats installed on machines that are accessing to its servers. VAC ban is typically automated and triggers when outside changes are made to the game that give players a competitive advantage.

Steam Database on 6 July 2017 .

An additional 9,415 accounts got banned, bringing the total value lost up to $9,580, according to Vac-Ban.

Vac-Ban on 6 July 2017

Game-hackers often take advantage of sales to scoop up copies of games on multiple accounts such as Dota 2 and Counter-Strike: Global Offensive because of low price. When a player banned by VAC, they are no longer allowed to join Valve servers, which make their skins and other digital items useless. Endless examples of “dead” inventories can be found on Reddit’s /r/VAC_Porn subreddit. Total value of items lost to the VAC graveyard nearly reached $10,000 on July 6.

Many of the culprits of the colossal July 6 bans were likely trying to cheat in Counter Strike: Global Offensive as more than $8,000 worth of weapons skins were surrendered.

Read more on Digital Trends: VALVE CRACKS DOWN ON CHEATERS, BANS A RECORD 40,000 IN A SINGLE DAY

VAC bans are permanent, non-negotiable, and cannot be removed by Steam Support, If a VAC ban is determined to have been issued incorrectly, it will automatically be removed. VAC banned accounts can still play single-player games, local LAN games, and multiplayer on non VAC-secured game servers. While we understand this can be frustrating, we must maintain a zero tolerance policy for cheating to foster a fair game that all players will enjoy.

Statement from Steam Support official site.

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